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Accueil du site > Production scientifique > Molecular complexes of simple anions with electron-deficient arenes : spectroscopic evidence for two types of structural motifs for anion-arene interactions.

Molecular complexes of simple anions with electron-deficient arenes : spectroscopic evidence for two types of structural motifs for anion-arene interactions.

Date de publication: 17 août 2009

B. Chiavarino, M.E. Crestoni, S. Fornarini, F. Lanucara, J. Lemaire, P. Maître, D. Scuderi
Chemistry 15 (33) 8185-95 (2009). DOI

Travail réalisé sur le site de l’Université Paris Sud.

Abstract

Anion-pi interactions between a pi-acidic aromatic system and an anion are gaining increasing recognition in chemistry and biology. Herein, the binding features of an electron-deficient aromatic system (1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB)) and selected anions (OH-, Br-, and I-) are examined in the gas phase by using the combined information derived from collision-induced dissociation experiments at variable energy, infrared multiple-photon dissociation spectroscopy, and quantum chemical calculations. We provide spectroscopic evidence for two different structural motifs of anion-arene complexes depending on the nature of the anion. The TNB-OR- complexes (R=H, or alkyl groups which were studied earlier) adopt an anionic sigma-complex structure whereby RO- attacks the aromatic ring with covalent bond formation, and develops a tetrahedral ring carbon bound to H and OR. The halide complexes rather conform to a structure in which the TNB moiety is hardly altered, and the halogen is placed on an unsubstituted carbon atom over the periphery of the ring at a C-X distance that is appreciably longer than a typical covalent bond length. The ensuing structural motif, previously characterized in the solid state and named weak sigma interaction, is now confirmed by an IR spectroscopic assay in the gas phase, in which the sampled species are unperturbed by crystal packing or solvation effects.