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Accueil du site > Production scientifique > Possible conformational change within the desolvated and cationized sBBI/Trypsin non-covalent complex during the CID process

Possible conformational change within the desolvated and cationized sBBI/Trypsin non-covalent complex during the CID process

Date de publication: 19 mai 2011

E. Darii, G. Saravanamuthu, C. Afonso, S. Alves, I. Gut, J.-C. Tabet
Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom. 25 1725 (2011). DOI

Travail réalisé sur le site de l’Université Pierre et Marie Curie.

Abstract

Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has become an analytical technique widely used for the investigation of non-covalent protein-protein and protein-ligand complexes due to the soft desolvation conditions that preserve the stoichiometry of the interacting partners. Dissociation studies of solvated or desolvated complexes (in the source and in the collision cell, respectively) allow access to information on protein conformation and localization of the metal ions involved in protein structure stabilization and biological activity. The complex of bovine trypsin and small soybean Bowman-Birk inhibitor (sBBI) was studied by ESI-MS to determine changes occurring within the complex during its transfer from droplets to the gas phase independently of the ion polarity. Under collision-induced dissociation (CID) conditions, unexpected binding of the Ca2+ ion (cofactor of native trypsin) to the inhibitor molecule was observed within the desolvated sBBI/trypsin/Ca2+ complex (with a 1:1:1 stoichiometry). This formal gas-phase migration of the calcium ion from trypsin to the inhibitor may be related to conformational rearrangements in the solvent-free and likely collapsed complex. However, under conditions leading to the increase in complex charge state, the appearance of the cationized trypsin molecule was detected during complex dissociation, thus reflecting different pathways of the evolution of complex conformation.